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Police Department

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Police Department

Mission Statement

The mission of the Hoboken Police Department is to be Community Sensitive while providing outstanding service to all components of our city. We want to be community sensitive to:

  1. Our Victims; we will take the extra steps to ensure crime victims and their families are treated with respect and professionalism while their case is handled with the upmost care, utilizing police resources in an effective and efficient manner.
  2. Our Residents; we want all of our residents to be treated with dignity and respect; having available an assortment of crime prevention and community out-reach programs that will foster relationships between our officers and our community.
  3. Our Community Leaders; we want to build and enhance relationships with all community leaders from all groups so the police best understand their community and their community’s needs while establishing strong foundations of communication and trust.
  4. Government Leaders; our government leaders are the representatives of their constituents and we want positive relationships with all of them as we proactively work toward building a better and safer community.
  5. The Media; through our transparent approach of providing timely and appropriate information, we want to build a strong symbiotic relationship with all types of media and in doing so we expect those media outlets to provide essential, accurate, and real-time information to our community.
  6. Our Officers; we need to be sensitive to our own officer’s needs so that they can best protect our city and its residents by being in the best physical and psychological condition possible.

Code of Ethics

AS A LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE, my fundamental duty is to serve the  community; to safeguard  lives  and  property;  to  protect  the  innocent  against  deception,  the  weak  against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder; and  to  respect the constitutional rights of all to liberty, equality and justice.

I WILL keep my private life unsullied as an example to all and will behave in a manner that does not bring discredit to me or to my agency. I will maintain courageous calm in the face of danger, scorn or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and be constantly mindful of the welfare of others. Honest in thought and deed both in my personal and official life, I will be exemplary in obeying the law and the regulations of my department. Whatever I see or hear of a confidential nature or that is confided to me in my official capacity will be kept ever secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty.

I WILL never act officiously or permit personal feelings, prejudices, political beliefs, aspirations, animosities or friendships to influence my decisions. With no compromise for crime and with relentless prosecution of criminals, I will enforce the law courteously and appropriately without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never employing unnecessary force or violence and never accepting gratuities.

I RECOGNIZE the badge of my office as a symbol of public faith, and I accept it as a public trust to be held so long as I am true to the ethics of police service. I will never engage in acts of corruption or bribery, nor will I condone such acts by other police officers. I will cooperate with all legally authorized agencies and their representatives in the pursuit of justice. I know that I alone am responsible for my own standard of professional performance and will take every reasonable opportunity to enhance and improve my level of knowledge and competence.   I will constantly strive  to  achieve  these  objectives  and  ideals,  dedicating  myself  to  my  chosen profession…LAW ENFORCEMENT.

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Police Department

Contact Info

Police Department

Mission Statement

The mission of the Hoboken Police Department is to be Community Sensitive while providing outstanding service to all components of our city. We want to be community sensitive to:

  1. Our Victims; we will take the extra steps to ensure crime victims and their families are treated with respect and professionalism while their case is handled with the upmost care, utilizing police resources in an effective and efficient manner.
  2. Our Residents; we want all of our residents to be treated with dignity and respect; having available an assortment of crime prevention and community out-reach programs that will foster relationships between our officers and our community.
  3. Our Community Leaders; we want to build and enhance relationships with all community leaders from all groups so the police best understand their community and their community’s needs while establishing strong foundations of communication and trust.
  4. Government Leaders; our government leaders are the representatives of their constituents and we want positive relationships with all of them as we proactively work toward building a better and safer community.
  5. The Media; through our transparent approach of providing timely and appropriate information, we want to build a strong symbiotic relationship with all types of media and in doing so we expect those media outlets to provide essential, accurate, and real-time information to our community.
  6. Our Officers; we need to be sensitive to our own officer’s needs so that they can best protect our city and its residents by being in the best physical and psychological condition possible.

Code of Ethics

AS A LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE, my fundamental duty is to serve the  community; to safeguard  lives  and  property;  to  protect  the  innocent  against  deception,  the  weak  against oppression or intimidation and the peaceful against violence or disorder; and  to  respect the constitutional rights of all to liberty, equality and justice.

I WILL keep my private life unsullied as an example to all and will behave in a manner that does not bring discredit to me or to my agency. I will maintain courageous calm in the face of danger, scorn or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and be constantly mindful of the welfare of others. Honest in thought and deed both in my personal and official life, I will be exemplary in obeying the law and the regulations of my department. Whatever I see or hear of a confidential nature or that is confided to me in my official capacity will be kept ever secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty.

I WILL never act officiously or permit personal feelings, prejudices, political beliefs, aspirations, animosities or friendships to influence my decisions. With no compromise for crime and with relentless prosecution of criminals, I will enforce the law courteously and appropriately without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never employing unnecessary force or violence and never accepting gratuities.

I RECOGNIZE the badge of my office as a symbol of public faith, and I accept it as a public trust to be held so long as I am true to the ethics of police service. I will never engage in acts of corruption or bribery, nor will I condone such acts by other police officers. I will cooperate with all legally authorized agencies and their representatives in the pursuit of justice. I know that I alone am responsible for my own standard of professional performance and will take every reasonable opportunity to enhance and improve my level of knowledge and competence.   I will constantly strive  to  achieve  these  objectives  and  ideals,  dedicating  myself  to  my  chosen profession…LAW ENFORCEMENT.

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Citizen Resources

News

Accident Reports

If you were involved in a motor vehicle accident and it was documented by a Hoboken Police Officer with a case number and written report, you may receive a copy of the report if applicable. Reports are generally available for review following 5 business days of the incident date. Reports can be downloaded online from CrashDocs any time or picked up at the Hoboken Police Records Bureau during normal business hours.

Emergency Blood Drive at Hoboken Police Department

Blood donors are in short supply over the summer so New Jersey Blood Services wants as many people to show up for its annual August blood drive at the Hoboken Police Department today.

Donors have until 8 p.m. Wednesday the 14th of August to give blood at the Hoboken Police Headquarters at 106 Hudson St.

Be a hero. Save a life.

All donors will receive a $5 Dunkin gift card.

Please bring photo ID and eat before donating blood.

Appointments encouraged at: www.Tinyurl.com/GiveBloodNJBS

Use sponsor code: 04057 or Text: (917) 699-9073

Walk-ins welcomed! Food available for all donors!

Hoboken National Night Out 2019

On Tuesday, August 6, 2019, The Hoboken Police Department and Stevens Police Department will be hosting “National Night Out in Hoboken”.  National Night Out, also known as “America’s Night Out Against Crime”, is an annual, nationwide event that allows the community workers to give back to their community.  The annual event will take place in Hoboken’s centrally located Church Square Park, where a large slate of family and youth-oriented activities is scheduled to take place from 5pm until 9pm.  Come out and enjoy free, delicious food from Gringo’s Tacos and Nigel’s Hot Dog Truck.  We will have a bounce house, water slide, spin art, a photo booth, and various giveaways throughout the night.  The Hoboken Fire Department will be present performing a “Jaws of Life” vehicle safety demonstration.  We will be conducting free child car seat inspections from inside the parking lot of the A J Demarest School (158 4th Street).  There will also be a tent set up for a designated sensory cool down zone for the benefit of children needing a period of downtime.

National Night Out is designed to: (1) Heighten crime and drug prevention awareness; (2) Generate support for, and participation in, local anticrime efforts; (3) Strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships; and (4) Send a message to criminals letting them know neighborhoods are organized and fighting back.

In addition to the participation of various police agencies, several local businesses will be out in full support of this night out against crime.   People of all ages are encouraged to attend.

The National Night Out event is celebrated by over 37 million participants and over 16,000 communities across the United States.

For further information or to set up a table for the event please contact Officer Anthony Fesken at feskena@hobokenpd.org (201-957-2127) and or Lieutenant Melissa Gigante at gigantem@hobokenpd.org or visit our website, www.Hobokenpd.com.

The HPD and SPD hope you can come out and help us fight against crime!

Hoboken Police Department Junior Police Academy

Applications for the 2019 Junior Police Academy will be given to the schools and will be available at Police Headquarters (106 Hudson Street) starting in April.  Applications can be dropped off at Police Headquarters before Friday, May 3, 2019 at any time (please mark with Attention: School Resource Unit.)

When:  July 8 to July 12, 2019

             9 am to 3 pm

Where:  Steven’s Institute of Technology (Castle Point on Hudson)

Who:   Open to all City of Hoboken residents ages 12 through 15 at the start of the Junior Police Academy. 20 applicants will be selected in a public lottery. If more than 20 applications are received preference will be given to returning Recruits.

The goal of Junior Police Academy is to familiarize children with the role of a Police Officer.  Participants should be prepared for a hands-on experience of a wide variety of Law Enforcement techniques and training.

The Junior Police Academy consists of various activities to prepare youths for future entry into the law enforcement field.  Several neighboring agencies including New Jersey State Police and Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office will be coming in to teach the participants the many different aspects of law enforcement.  In addition, there will be one hour of physical training per day.  Lunch will be provided daily.

Children are required to wear sneakers along with the issued t-shirt, shorts, baseball cap, gym bag, and water bottle (items provided at orientation).

All instruction, demonstrations and presentations will be administered and supervised by the men and women of the Hoboken Police Department.

Waivers MUST be completed for participation in this program if selected for the program.

Any questions please e-mail us at gigantem@hobokenpd.org & depascalej@hobokenpd.org

Licenses, Permits & Forms

Firearms Investigations Unit

Please follow the below instructions for the new Firearms Application Registration System (FARS):

FARS Application Procedures for Applicants

Step 1: Visit this website. You MUST enter the site address as follows:
https://www.njportal.com/NJSP/fars

Step 2: When you log on, you must enter the Hoboken Police Department’s ORI number: NJ0090500

Step 3: Complete the online application. Be sure to enter your “Official Name” (e.g. Joseph vs. Joe). You may complete the application using a smartphone, mobile device, laptop, or desktop computer.

Step 4: You will need to submit payment at the Police department for your permits and, if applicable, the Firearms ID card. Permits to Purchase handguns are $2 for each permit, and $5 for the ID card. Payment is made in the form of one money order made out to City of Hoboken for the total amount requested.

Tips
The new process is applicant driven. Please ensure that you have entered the best phone numbers for yourself and references as well as the best email addresses for yourself and references.

Please advise your references that the FARS system will email them the reference questions to be answered. Your references can complete the questions using a smartphone, mobile device, laptop, or desktop computer. Please advise them to complete the questions immediately to progress your background investigation.

You will be receiving automated email updates throughout this new process.

The Firearms Investigator, Officer Libon Schelmety, can be reached at 201-420-5103

ABC

The Hoboken Police Department has launched a new digital application for Liquor License Employee ID Cards.

Click below to view the form, read instructions, fill out the form, and pay online.

Click Here to Begin Your Application

BAR CARDS ARE NON-REFUNDABLE

Forms

Crime Prevention & Safety Tips

Child Safety Seat Inspection/Installation

The Hoboken Police Department offers child safety seat inspections and installations during the following days and times:

  • Daily from 8:00 am to 10:00 pm
  • Walk-ins on evenings and weekends are accepted
  • Appointments can be made by calling the Traffic Unit at

Bicycle Registration

Bicycles are often stolen and many bicycle owners do not have their Serial Numbers recorded and in a safe place to provide to police. Without a description and serial number recorded, even if the stolen bicycle is recovered by police, it is very difficult to return the bicycle to its rightful owner.

By registering your bicycle/s with the Hoboken Police Department, it will make it easier to return your stolen bike to you should it be recovered.

  • Register your bicycle/s using our FILLABLE PDF FORM and bringing it to Police Headquarters.
  • You will need to complete a new form for each bicycle that you own (i.e., you have two bicycles, complete the form twice).
  • Please be as accurate as possible with filling in the information.
  • Be sure to print a copy of the completed registration form for your records!

IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER:

If your bike is stolen…

Report any stolen property immediately to your local law enforcement agency. If your bike was stolen in the city of Hoboken, please call the Hoboken Police Department non-emergency line at 201-420-2100 to make your report. Have your bicycle serial number and other identification information ready to provide for the report.

What if I sell my bike?

If you sell your bike after you have enrolled with the Hoboken Police Department Bike Registration Program, contact the Hoboken Police Department at 201-420-2100 to notify us of the transfer.

Lastly, don’t forget:

  • Always wear a helmet.
  • Always lock up your bike. Whether you use a bike lock or place it in a storage space, keep it under lock and key!
  • Ride your bike safely. Always follow the rules of the road and be sure to keep a watchful eye on young riders.

Complete your bicycle registration by downloading and completing this pdf form.

Impaired Driving Enforcement Crackdown to be Conducted Locally as Part of National Campaign

Police agencies from around New Jersey are gearing up for the state’s largest annual drunk driving crackdown. The 2017 “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” Statewide Labor Day Crackdown begins August 18 and concludes on September 4. During the campaign, local and state law enforcement officers will conduct sobriety checkpoints and roving patrols targeting motorists who may be driving while impaired by alcohol or drugs.

“Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” is a national campaign designed to raise awareness about the dangers of drinking and driving through high-visibility enforcement backed up by educational activities including national radio and television advertisements, posters, banners and mobile video display signs. The campaign looks to curtail impaired driving during the busy summer travel season, including the Labor Day holiday period.

“Despite years of enforcement and public awareness efforts, too many people still make the unfortunate decision to get behind the wheel while impaired. Nearly 30% of all motor vehicle fatalities in New Jersey are alcohol related,” said Gary Poedubicky, Acting Director of the NJ Division of Highway Traffic Safety. “This is a zero tolerance campaign. If drivers are caught operating their vehicle while impaired they will be arrested,” he added.

As part of the initiative, the Division of Highway Traffic Safety provides grants to local police agencies throughout the state to run the two-week campaign. During last year’s crackdown, participating agencies made 1,649 DWI arrests.

Law enforcement agencies participating in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over 2017 crackdown offer the following advice:

  • If you plan to drink, designate a driver, someone who will not drink alcohol, before going out.
  • Take mass transit, a taxi or ask a sober friend to drive you home.
  • Spend the night where the activity is held.
  • Always buckle up, every ride, regardless of your seating position in the vehicle.  It’s your best defense against an impaired driver.
  • If you’re intoxicated and traveling on foot, the safest way to get home is to take a cab or have a sober friend or family member drive you to your doorstep.

Hoboken PD to Participate in National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day

The Hoboken Police Department is participating in the “National Take Back Initiative” which is sponsored by the Drug Enforcement Agency (www.dea.gov).

This initiative, which will take place on Saturday, April 30 between the hours of 9:30 am and 2:15 pm, aims to provide a safe, convenient and responsible means of disposing prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of medications.

The drop off sites will be a place where residents will be able to turn in unused or expired medication for safe disposal. The Hoboken Police will have drop off stations throughout the city, focusing on senior citizen residences. The idea is to make the program more accessible to those whom might otherwise have difficulty responding to one or two fixed locations. There will be a fixed location at Police Headquarters during the entire time. Additionally, there will be two moving sites that will spend over an hour at various senior resident buildings.

The drop off locations and times are as follows:

  • Hoboken Police Department, 106 Hudson Street: 9:30am to 2:15pm
  • 400 First Street: 9:30am to 11:45am
  • 221 Jackson Street: 9:30am to 11:45am
  • 514 Madison Street: 9:30am to 11:45am
  • 220 Adams Street: 12:00pm to 2:15pm
  • 76 Bloomfield Street: 12:00pm to 2:15pm
  • 311 13th  Street: 12:00pm to 2:15pm

General Public Inquiries:

Traffic Bureau will be conducting a D.W.I. checkpoint on Saturday, December 19, 2015

The Hoboken Police Department’s Traffic Bureau will be conducting a D.W.I. checkpoint on Saturday, December 19, 2015. The location of the checkpoint will be in the Southern end of the City. The approximate hours of operation will be from 10pm until 2:00 a.m.

The goal of the program is to reduce citizen involvement/injury, due to D.W.I.-related collisions. Through implementation of this and similar events, the Hoboken Police Department hopes to significantly reduce accidents, injuries and property damage throughout our city. Informational pamphlets will be handed out on site.

The Hoboken Police Department is committed to working hand-in-hand with the citizens of Hoboken to provide a safe environment for the motoring public. For more information, contact the Hoboken Police Traffic Bureau at (201) 420-5109.

Hoboken Police and Fire “Fill the Bus” Toy Drive

The Hoboken Police and Fire Departments, in partnership with the Hoboken Special Needs Parent Group, will be hosting our annual toy drive and Fill the Bus events.  The toy drive will have several drop locations throughout the city beginning November 1st and ending December 2nd, 2015.  Our Fill the Bus event will be Wednesday, December 10th, 2015 from 7am-7pm, outside Hoboken Police Headquarters (106 Hudson Street).  The Fill the Bus Event will offset toys collected in November.  Toys will be distributed to Hoboken children in need.

If you are interested in participating, please bring a new, unwrapped gift to Hoboken Police Headquarters on December 10th, or to one of our following drop locations between November 1st, and December 2nd:

  • Hoboken Police Department
  • 106 Hudson Street
  • Hoboken Firehouse
  • 1313 Washington or
  • 801 Clinton Street
  • My  Gym- Hoboken
  • 720 Monroe Street , #E312
  • Urban Jungle Play
  • 1140 Maxwell Lane
  • World of Wonder
  • 133 Harrison Street

If you, or someone you know, have a Hoboken family in need, please contact Sergeant Melissa Gigante @ 201-420-2100.

Crime Statistics

2020 Crime stats report released by the Hoboken Police Department.

There was a major decrease in violent crime (down 16.4%), helped by the 20.6% decrease in Aggravated Assaults.

Property crimes and non-violent crimes increased by 14.6%. Those numbers could be attributed to unemployment and the pandemic’s economic issues.

Thank you to our Uniformed, Investigative, and Training Bureaus and those bureaus’ commanders, supervisors, detectives, patrol officers, and civilian staffs for setting an example in New Jersey.

Great work was done by all through a most grueling and unique year.

Parking Regulations & Traffic Control Officers

Like most urban communities, the City of Hoboken has established, in addition to state statute, local regulations regarding parking in the City.

Parking regulations established by state law and local ordinance are enforced by the Hoboken Police Department and the Hoboken Parking Utility’s parking enforcement officers.

TRAFFIC CONTROL OFFICERS

As a reminder,  the Traffic Control Officers are an extension  of the Hoboken Police Department.  They are working very hard to keep our pedestrians safe.  They have the authority to establish a safer pedestrian crossing area and use traffic control devices to accomplish their goal and responsibilities.  Please work with and listen to our Traffic Control Officers  while crossing the streets and operating your vehicles for a safer community through the city of Hoboken.

Thank you

Tickets

Got a ticket?

It is unfortunate, but every once in a great while, you may be subject to receiving a summons. A summons (ticket) can be issued for various infractions of local City Ordinances as well as violations of the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Code (Title 39).

If you have received a summons, you have the following options:

1. You may contest the ticket and plead Not Guilty;
2. You may plead Guilty with an Explanation of the infraction, or
3. You may plead Guilty and pay the fine*

(* In certain cases, “Court Appearance Required” may either be checked off or may appear on the summons. In such cases, you will be required to appear in Court regardless of your plea. You should contact the Court in order to clarify your responsibilities in adjudicating this summons.)

If you decide to plead Not Guilty or Guilty with an Explanation, you may need to appear in court before the Judge to enter your plea. You should follow the instructions on the back of the summons in order to schedule your appearance. You should contact the court at least Seven (7) Days Prior to the date of appearance listed on the summons. You may contact the Hoboken Municipal Court Violations Bureau at 1-201-420-2123

If you decide to plead Guilty, and “Court Appearance Required” has not been checked off or does not appear in the fine area, you may be able to satisfy the summons online.

A link to the New Jersey Municipal Court System has been included on this page for your convenience. You will need the summons number and the license plate of the vehicle the summons was issued to in order to be able to use the system. Please use the link below to access the court web site.

NJ Municipal Courts Direct (NJMCD)

Please Note: The Hoboken Police Department has no connection with the Hoboken Municipal Court and does not adjudicate tickets. This link is provided as a convenience only.

Reporting Complaints

Members of the Hoboken Police Department are dedicated professionals who strive to create an atmosphere of consideration and cooperation within our community.

The Members of the Hoboken Police Department practice P.R.I.D.E. (Professional Responsibility In Daily Endeavors) along with C.P.R. (Courtesy Professionalism & Respect).

We take any matter regarding our personnel seriously. If you feel at any time that a member of this department has acted in a manner that you feel is improper, you are encouraged to bring the matter to the attention of any supervisor on duty by calling 201-420-2131 who will be able to assist you in resolving your complaint.

If you feel that your complaint warrants additional attention, you are encouraged to bring the matter directly to our Professional Standards Bureau at 201-420-2089.

You may also file a written complaint at any time at Police Headquarters by speaking with the Desk Officer on duty.

2020 Professional Standards Annual Summary Report Form

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – English Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Arabic Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Chinese Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Haitian Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Hindi Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Korean Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Polish Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Portuguese Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Spanish Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Tagalog Download

Internal Affairs Complaint Form – Vietanamese Download

History

Hoboken Police Museum

On June 11, 1851, the Hoboken City Council passed an ordinance forming a paid Police Department. The Hoboken Police Department was established in 1855 as a seven man police force.

The Hoboken Police Museum is located on the 2nd floor of the Police Department Headquarters, located at 106 Hudson Street. The museum is free and open to the public.

Chiefs of the Hoboken Police Department

Chief Kenneth F. Ferrante

(Present)

Chief Kenneth Ferrante was appointed Chief on October 27th, 2014 and sworn into the position on December 1, 2014. He is 46 years old, and is a lifelong Hoboken resident. His parents are retired Hoboken Police Captain Fred, who served the Hoboken Police Department for 32 years, and Patricia Ferrante.

Ferrante was hired as a Police Officer on June 11, 1993. He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant on June 12, 2003, then to the rank of Lieutenant on January 23, 2008.

Ferrante holds a Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice on the Police Administration track from New Jersey City University which he attained in May of 2005. He also received a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice in May of 1999 also from New Jersey City University.

Ferrante’s awards include the Combat Cross for apprehending a suspect who had disarmed and injured officers. He also received the Honorable Service awards for quelling a riot and making arrests with no injuries to officers, and for apprehending a sexual predator who was extorting money from youths. He also received Exceptional Duty awards for busting a gambling operation while off-duty and attending classes at a local college, and for solving a Hit and Run with serious injuries at 4th and Monroe Sts. He also received multiple Commendations for his involvement at scenes of homicides, robberies, and missing persons.

Ferrante is also formally trained in many areas. He was trained in Dignitary Protection by the New York Police Department. He was certified by the Community Policing institute at the Bergen County Police Academy. He also attended multiple Crime Prevention courses. Other certifications include: DWI Recognition and Standard Field Sobriety Tests, DWI Breathalyzer operator and Alco-Test Operator, Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E. officer), Methods of Instruction (M.O.I. certified), FBI Intensive Supervision conducted at New Jersey State Police Training Facility, CPR Instructor Course conducted at St. Michael’s Hospital in Newark.

Some of Ferrante’s assignments have included: as a Patrol Officer, he was a Community police Officer and was also detailed to the Anti-Crime plain clothes detail. As a Sergeant, he was the Community Policing Unit supervisor. As a Lieutenant, at different times, he commanded the Uniform Patrol Bureau’s day, evening and midnight tours. He was also the Community Policing commander, as well as the School Resource Officers’ commander and the Hoboken Housing Authority day commander in 2009 and 2010.

Ferrante also was the commander for many high profile events which include: tour commander during the Super Bowl operation, uniform commander during three gun scenes in October of 2013, uniform personnel commander at scene of the search and arrest of a suspect wanted for a drive by shooting of a 70 year old woman in Jersey City, commander at the scene of the fatal fire at #2 Marineview Plaza, commander at the multi-dwelling fire at 70 Madison St, commander at the New Year’s day 11th and Adams St. fire, commander at the Mother’s Day 2011 PATH train crash, one of the south commanders for the Superstorm Sandy Operation, southeast commander for Hurricane Irene operation, waterfront commander for all of the Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks shows on the Hudson River, and the Washington Street commander for six St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Lepre-con days.

Ferrante also had extensive union leadership experience as a two time P.B.A.vice-president and a two term, four year P.S.O.A. president. He also has extensive collective bargaining experience having served on six contract negotiation teams, chairing four of those committees.

Ferrante also taught law enforcement as an instructor for A&M Test Prep in Bloomfield, N.J., where he prepared police officers, sergeants, lieutenants, and captains for promotional exams and taught classes on Attorney General Guidelines, supervision, management, administration and incident command from 2004-2010. He has also taught part time for Bernstein and Associates since 2014, teaching the same classes as he did for A&M while also prepping Chief and Deputy Chiefs’ candidates from around the State of New Jersey.

Ferrante also holds great pride in having been a 1990 graduate of St. Peter’s Prep, where he was a Presidential Scholar and where, as a senior he was an all-state linebacker for the 1989 State Champion Marauders. He went back to be a coach for the school from 1991-2000, and again from 2011-2013.

Ferrante also served as the City of Hoboken’s Office of Emergency management coordinator in 2013 and 2014, leaving the post on the day of his appointment to Police Chief.

In his five years as Chief, he has created the HPD’s first ever Waterfront and Parks Unit in 2015 and the department’s first Emergency Service Unit. He has also tripled the size of the department’s Traffic Unit and doubled the size and hours of the Investigations Bureau.

In December of 2018, Ferrante became President of the Hudson County Chiefs of Police Association.

Anthony P. Falco, Sr.

2009 – 2014

Chief Anthony P. Falco, Sr., was appointed the 9th Chief of the Hoboken Police Department by Mayor David Roberts on June 18, 2009, after achieving the No. 1 ranked position on the 2009 Police Chief’s Civil Service examination.

Chief Falco is currently in his 38th year of service in the Hoboken Police Department, having first been appointed to the department on January 1, 1971. During his first few years of service, Chief Falco served primarily in Uniformed Patrol.

In 1978, Chief Falco was among a select number of officers to be assigned to the newly re-formed Motorcycle Patrol Bureau. The Motorcycle Patrol Bureau continues to this day and Chief Falco is one of two remaining original members.

Chief Falco was subsequently promoted to the rank of Sergeant in December of 1979, then to the rank of Lieutenant in January of 1985. In April of 2001, Chief Falco was promoted to the rank of Captain, having achieved the top score on that test.

Prior to his appointment as Chief of Police, Chief Falco was the Commanding Officer of the Investigations Division, which encompasses both the Detective Bureau and the Anti-Vice Squad. Chief Falco has also served as the commander of several bureaus and units during his tenure, including the Training, Planning & Operations Bureau; the Community Policing Bureau (CPOP) as well as the Motorcycle Patrol Bureau.

A lifelong resident of Hoboken, Chief Falco graduated from Hoboken High School in 1966 and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Jersey City State College. Chief Falco also holds several certifications, including training in Narcotics & Criminal Investigation; Accident Investigation, Hazardous Materials Investigation and Hostage Negotiation. Chief Falco has also participated in the FBI’s Joint Conference on Terrorism.

Chief Falco is a founding member of the Hoboken Police Superior Officers Association. He is also a member of the New Jersey Honor Legion and the Italian American Police Officer’s Association of New Jersey. In addition, Chief Falco is also a member of New Jersey State Policemen’s Benevolent Association, Hoboken Local No.2,where he was the recipient of the State’s prestigious Gold Card Life Member award for his work as a member of that organization. He has also received the VFW Outstanding Citizen Award in 1975 and was selected as an “Outstanding Young Man in America” in 1979. Chief Falco holds several departmental commendations in recognition for his outstanding police work and has been recognized by N.J. Governors Thomas Kean & James Florio for his work.

Chief Falco is married to the former Georgean Hodges and is the proud father of Sgt. Anthony Falco, Jr. and Sgt. Melissa Falco-Gigante, who have both followed in their father’s footsteps and are current members of the department. In addition, both his son-in-law, P.O. Vito Gigante and his nephew, P.O. Jason Falco are also members of the department. He also served with his brother, Lt. Peter Falco for 25 years before his brother’s retirement from the department in 2006. Chief Falco is also the proud grandfather to Antonio, Vito and Vincent Gigante.

Carmen V. La Bruno

1991-2009

Carmen V. La Bruno was the 8th Chief of the Hoboken Police Department. Chief La Bruno was appointed to the position of Police Chief in 1991.

Chief La Bruno spent over 30 years in law enforcement, first appointed to the Hoboken Police Department as a Patrolman in 1971.

Chief La Bruno rose quickly through the ranks, scoring the top position on each of his promotional exams. He was promoted to Sergeant in 1977, to Lieutenant in 1982 and to Captain in 1985.

Just prior to his appointment as Chief of Police, Chief La Bruno served as the Chief of Investigators for the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office from 1986 to 1989.

Being a strong proponent of education, Chief La Bruno holds Masters Degrees in Criminal Justice and Philosophy from Jersey City State & from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, where he has advanced to candidacy for his Ph.D.

He is a former adjunct undergraduate professor at Seton Hall University and he is recognized by the New Jersey Department of Personnel as a subject matter expert.

George W. Crimmins 1970-1991
Ambrose A. Ryan 1961 – 1970
John F. Reynolds 1948 – 1961
Edward J. McFeely 1921 – 1948
Patrick Hayes 1902 – 1921
Charles Donovan 1878 – 1902
Charles Bernard 1855 – 1878

Fallen Heroes

In Memoriam

The Hoboken Police Department recognizes our Members of Service who have made the ultimate sacrifice while protecting and serving the people of Hoboken.

We remember their valor and will always remember their commitment to the profession that they loved. This is our solemn and sacred duty.

The Members of the Hoboken Police Department Killed in the Line of Duty

Patrolman Charles Gebhardt
End Of Watch: Tuesday, July 26, 1898
Cause Of Death: Gunfire

Patrolman John J. Condon
End Of Watch: Friday, August 15, 1902
Cause Of Death: Gunfire

Patrolman Bernard Murray
End Of Watch: Wednesday, October 2, 1918
Cause Of Death: Gunfire

Patrolman William Gudehus
End Of Watch: Thursday, October 10, 1918
Cause Of Death: Gunfire

Patrolman Joseph M. Jaeger
End Of Watch: Sunday, July 6, 1924
Cause Of Death: Gunfire

Patrolman Patrick J. Lane
End Of Watch: Friday, March 9, 1928
Cause Of Death: Gunfire

Patrolman Thomas F. Mcintyre
End Of Watch: Saturday, October 6, 1951
Cause Of Death: Motorcycle Accident

Crime Prevention & Safety Tips

Personal safety tips for walking

Tips from the Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office:

  • Have a plan, be suspicious, be aware of your surroundings, walk with confidence.
  • Walk with a friend whenever possible.
  • Avoid dark streets, high shrubbery, short cuts, and dark doorways. Try to walk facing oncoming traffic
  • Maintain a secure grip on handbags or purses, keep the flap towards your body. If someone tries to grab the
  • purse let him/her have it.
  • When you think you are being followed, you can: Turn and walk directly towards the individual and cross the street. Look the individual in the eye. Go to an open business, such as an all-night market, gas station, Police or Fire station, hospital emergency room, hotel lobby, etc.
  • Keep change with you in case you need to make a call. You can dial 911 on a pay phone without depositing change.
  • Be wary of newly acquired acquaintances. Don’t reveal personal information to new found friends. Wherever you are stay alert and tuned in to your surroundings.
  • Communicate the message that you’re calm, confident, and know where you are going. Stand tall, walk purposefully, and make quick eye contact with people around you.
  • If you walk at night constantly vary your routes.
  • If you work late at night, arrange to leave with a co-worker or accompanied by a security officer. Make sure your car is parked as close to the entrance as possible or move it to a safe spot in the late afternoon when people are leaving.
  • Keep your car locked and check the back seat and floor before getting in.
  • Don’t overload yourself with packages and don’t wear shoes or clothing that restrict your movements.
  • Avoid displaying large amounts of cash or other tempting targets such as jewelry or expensive clothing.
  • Carry a wallet in an inside coat or front trouser pocket.
  • Know the neighborhoods where you live and work. Find out what stores and restaurants are open late and know the locations of police and fire stations. If you are in an unfamiliar neighborhood, take a few minutes to look around for stores, telephones, and street lights.
  • Have your house or car keys in hand as you approach your vehicle or home.
  • Make your neighborhood and workplace safe by reporting broken street lights, clean up parks and vacant lots and lobbying local government for better lighting in public places.
  • If you see a crime being committed, call the police immediately and stay with the victim until help arrives. Be supportive and offer to accompany the victim to the hospital or police station.

Safety tips for women

Purse snatch:

  • DO NOT carry a bag that makes you a target. A bag that dangles from the shoulder can be easily yanked off your shoulder by someone coming up from behind.
  • DO NOT carry your bag in such a manner that you can’t let it go if you have to. Many women have been injured because their own bags acted as handcuffs as a purse snatcher yanked it away.
  • DO be aware of your surroundings and carry your bag close to your body, tucked in the bend of your elbow.
  • DO minimize the amount of money and credit cards that you carry with you on a daily basis. Divide your money between pockets and bags.
  • IF you are the victim of a purse snatch do not fight to hold onto your bag, especially if there is a weapon involved.

Coming home late at night:

  • Avoid shortcuts that are not well travelled or well lit.
  • Know what reputable stores are open in your neighborhood late at night. If you suspect that you are being followed stay away from lonely quiet blocks and head for the store you know to be open.
  • When walking to your car or on your way home, keep your keys in your hand until you are safely inside for added protection.
  • If someone drops you off at home by auto, ask the driver to wait until you are safely inside.
  • If a motorist bothers you while you are walking turn around and walk in the opposite direction of the car. Do this as often as necessary and he should get discouraged.

If you are driving:

  • Keep windows rolled up, except for a small. ventilation space and keep your doors locked.
  • If someone attempts to force you off the road, don’t panic….. blow your horn constantly to attract attention. If you are forced over, as soon as you stop put your car in reverse and back away….. keep blowing the horn and moving the car as much as possible.
  • If you suspect that someone is following you make a few turns down active streets if possible. If the auto you suspect is following you makes the same turns as you then head for the nearest police station, fire house or open store. Don’t try to make it to your own quiet residential area.
  • Try to park your car in a well lighted area, this is not only good from the standpoint of dicouraging a personal attack on you but also for reducing the chance of auto theft. Look around before you get out of your car.
  • Before getting into your car, look inside first to make sure no one is hiding in the back seat. When leaving your car, make sure it is locked.

At home you should:

  • Have your key ready before you get to the front door.
  • Make sure your entrance area is well lighted.
  • If you live in an apartment don’t be polite and hold the lobby door open for a stranger who has been waiting.
  • List only your last name and first initial in your mailbox.
  • Don’t buzz someone inside unless you know them.
  • If a stranger wants to use your phone for any kind of call from business to emergency …….. keep him out and you make the call for them! Any problems or in doubt? Call the police!
  • If you arrive home and find your door open DO NOT GO INSIDE call the police from a pay phone or neighbor’s house and ask them to meet you.
  • Don’t get on the elevator with a stranger if your own good judgment warns you against it — need an excuse to avoid embarrassment say something like; “Oh I forgot my mail.”

If you are the victim of a rape:

  • Report crime immediately to Police. Call 911.
  • Do not wash or douche.
  • Have a medical exam and internal gynecological exam as soon as possible accompanied by a police officer preferably.
  • Inform doctor of exact acts committed upon you and have him note any medical evidence of them.
  • Semen smears must be taken by the doctor.
  • Doctor should note any bruises or injuries (bleeding, lacerations, etc.) external or internal.
  • Have the doctor test for venereal diseases (and pregnancy later if relevant).
  • Inform the police of all details of attack, however intimate, and of anything unusual you may have noted about the attacker. remember, what he said and how he said it may lead to his arrest.
  • Show police any external bruises or injuries however minor, resulting from the attack. Also show them to a friend or relative who might be available as a corroborative witness at the trial.
  • Give the undergarments to the police (for semen analysis).
  • Give any torn or stained clothing to the police.
  • When calm, make note of events of attack, unusual details, etc.

Night life safety tips

  • Do not accept drinks from anyone if you did not see them prepared.
  • Do not leave your drink unattended for any period of time.
  • Always inform a family member or friend of your whereabouts.
  • When entering a bar or club, always know where emergency exits are located in case of a fire or other emergencies.
  • Be familiar with your surroundings (street names, landmarks, etc.); this specific information will be needed to locate you.
  • Do not drink and drive or accept a ride from anyone who has been drinking.
  • Designate a driver who will not drink.
  • Do not leave your bag unattended.
  • Arrange a buddy system with a friend and always watch after each other.
  • Never leave a bar or club with a stranger.
  • Carry a cell phone. When possible, call 911 if you are being harassed.
  • Always carry enough money for a taxi.

Rental scams & other internet fraud prevention tips

Scams are a reality of shopping online and offline.

Always be wary of giving personal information, financial information, or payments of any kind to people you don’t know personally.

How to avoid being victimized:

•   Long-distance inquiries.
Take extra care in long-distance situations, especially from users in foreign countries. There are a number of scam attempts that involve individuals in foreign countries who say they are interested in purchasing or renting out a home.

•    Requests that you send a check or money order, or wire funds.
Most scams eventually involve such a request, and there are many variations. A scammer may have convincing reasons why they need to deal remotely. They may wire overpayment of funds to you and request that you wire back a refund. They may ask you to use a false online “escrow service”. Do not wire funds to anyone you haven’t met personally. Do not accept wire funds that you did not initiate.

•    Requests for personal and/or financial information.
With identity theft on the rise, it is a good general rule to provide your personal/financial information sparingly, and only to trusted sources.

•    Typos, grammatical errors and inflated stories.
Emails that are filled with spelling and grammatical errors are usually a sign of fraud. Also, the sender might claim the importance of themselves or the person they are representing (“I work with the United nations development program”) and could also weave an involved story about family issues.

•    An agent or landlord should never ask for personal information or a phone verification code prior to seeing a property.
Any requests for bank account numbers, Social Security numbers, or being asked to provide them with a code sent to your cell phone via text or call are all signs of a potential scam. Also, research the average rental rates in that area and be suspicious if the rate is significantly lower.

Report Scams and Fraud

•    Hoboken Police Department 201-420-2100.
•    Federal Trade Commission:  via its toll free hotline: 877-FTC-HELP (877-382-4357) or the FTC online complaint form
•    Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Internet Fraud Complaint Center

Auto theft prevention tips

Auto break-ins usually have one thing in common: there’s something left in the car worth stealing. Most larcenies from cars are “crimes of opportunity” that could be prevented by taking some preventative steps:

  • Don’t leave valuables in your vehicle: You’d be surprised how often this happens, but individuals leave valuable items in plain sight all the time. If you leave items in your vehicle and they’re visible, the chances your vehicle will get broken into, increase greatly.
  • Never leave the keys to your vehicle in the ignition while you exit the vehicle. A thief will take your vehicle in seconds.
  • If you are driving alone, ensure your vehicle doors are locked. This will prevent anyone from entering the passenger side of your vehicle while idling at a traffic control device.
  • Place items out of sight BEFORE reaching your destination: Someone may be watching when you put your valuables under a seat or in the trunk and the moment you’re gone, a thief could break into your car. So place those items in a safe place before you get to the park, beach, baseball game, etc. Valuable items that thieves target are GPS units, MP3 players, credit cards, money, packages and so forth. If you can’t take the items with you, secure them in a safe place in your vehicle, like a locked glove compartment or your trunk.
  • Avoid leaving packages or shopping bags out in the open: Lock them into your trunk, if you have to leave the vehicle unattended. Never open a trunk, fill it full of valuables, close it, and then just walk away.
  • Lock ALL of your vehicle’s doors: This is true even if you plan on only being gone for “just a second”. Remember, it only takes seconds to steal items from your car. It’s not uncommon, for thieves to walk down a row of parked vehicles, looking for unlocked doors. Also, make sure car windows aren’t left open.
  • Park in busy, well lit areas: Pick a parking spot where there is a lot of activity. Auto thieves prefer breaking into cars in isolated areas.
  • Don’t leave a trace: Don’t leave any sign that there might be valuables “out of sight” in your vehicle. For example: the suction cup on your dashboard, might tell thieves, that you have a GPS system in your vehicle. Leave nothing in plain view. Very few auto break-ins are “random”. The thieves usually see something out in the open or hints of possible hidden valuables.
  • Alarms or anti-theft devices work: Thieves are usually looking for the “easiest” target. If your car has an alarm, it could act as a deterrent. But don’t make this common mistake: Just because you have an alarm, doesn’t mean thieves won’t break-in, IF you leave valuable items in plain sight.
  • Don’t leave spare keys in your vehicle: An experienced thief knows all the hiding places. Store spare keys elsewhere, possibly your wallet or purse.
  • If, in the event you are the victim of a carjacking, do not attempt to prevent the taking of your vehicle. Individuals who carjack a vehicle usually work in tandem with another who operates a second vehicle. This vehicle is used to block the path of anyone who attempts to follow them. Try to get as much of a physical description of the actor/s as possible, a description of the second vehicle as well as a licence plate number.

Call the police immediately at 201-420-2100, 201-420-2130 or 911 if your the victim of a carjacking.

Bike theft prevention tips

  • Always lock your bike, especially at home (even in the garage, apartment building or college dorm).
  • Always lock your bike’s frame and wheels with a high-quality, modern U-lock (that has a flat or disc key). Lightweight cable or chain locks do not provide adequate security in most areas.
  • For the greatest theft deterrence, use two locks such as a U-lock and a locking cable. The longer it takes a thief to get through your bike security, the less likely your bike will be stolen.
  • Lock to a fixed, immovable object like a permanent bike rack. Be careful not to lock to items that can be easily cut, broken or removed. Be careful that your bike cannot be lifted over the top of the object to which it is locked.
  • Lock in a visible and well-lit area.
  • Lock in a location where there are other bikes. The chances are better that there will be a bike with a less secure lock than yours. Thieves will usually go for the easiest target.
  • When using a U-lock, position your bike frame and wheels so that you fill or take up as much of the open space within the U-portion of the lock as possible. The tighter the lock up, the harder it is for a thief to use tools to attack your lock.
  • Always position a U-lock so that the keyway is facing down towards the ground. Don’t position the lock close to the ground. This makes it more difficult for a thief to attack it.
  • Always remove or secure your quick-release components and detachable accessories, including lights and bags, with a secondary cable lock.
  • Don’t lock your bike to itself (the front wheel locked to frame). It can be easily lifted and carried away.
  • Don’t lock in the same location all the time. A thief may notice the pattern and target your bike.
  • Don’t lock to anything posted illegal. Check with area law enforcement agencies for local bike parking regulations.
  • Always check your lock before leaving your bike to be sure you have secured it properly.
  • Visit the following sites for additional tips and resources: bicycling, gearpatrol, bikespike

GPS theft prevention tips

One of the “hottest” items that thieves are targeting both locally and nationally, is the GPS system in your vehicle. Here are some tips to prevent GPS theft:

  • Removing your GPS unit from the dashboard or windshield alone, without removing its cradle or mounting doesn’t guarantee that a thief still won’t break into your car. Today’s GPS thieves often are willing to gamble that an empty GPS cradle suggests that its owner has taken the action of removing the GPS unit and storing it underneath one of the vehicle’s seats.
  • Keep your windshields and dashes clean. Even taking the extra precaution of removing the GPS device’s cradle might still not be enough to stop a break-in into your car. The suction cups used to secure the GPS unit’s cradle to the car’s dashboard or windshield can leave a ring of film on the glass. The Police Department recommends that you use micro fiber cloths or moist towelettes to wipe away any ring of film from the GPS cradle suction cup.
  • Hide or remove the power cord or any other accessories.
  • Some GPS units now have a password to use. This makes the GPS useless to the thief and they may pawn the device, allowing for the possibility that the police may recover the device.

Residential burglary prevention tips

Burglary is a crime of opportunity. If you and your neighbors work to prevent the opportunity, you and your home will be that much safer. Outlined below are proactive measures that residents can take to possibly prevent burglaries.

  • Know your neighbors and look out for each other’s homes. This is the key to neighborhood security. If you know your neighbors and typical schedule, it’s much more likely that you’ll be aware when something is out of the ordinary. Talk to your neighbors when leaving on vacation; tell them how long you expect to be away.
  • Install an alarm system with a monitoring station (i.e. A.D.T.), if a burglar sees a decal stating that there is an alarm system, they will most likely seek another victim. Some alarm systems have the capability that allows you to remotely control lighting and electronics from a smart-phone or laptop computer, you can also view live images of your residence.
  • If going on vacation, arrange for your mail to be held by the post office and have a neighbor pick up any newspaper deliveries or flyers.
  • Train children so they know not to answer the door when your gone and never give information out over the phone to callers they don’t know. (This may vary depending on the age of the child.)
  • Lock all doors and windows when you leave your residence, even if you are leaving for a short errand.
  • Ensure that doors accessible to the exterior are equipped with deadbolts and reinforced strike plates. The dead bolt makes it difficult to “pick” and the strike plate makes it difficult to just kick the door in.
  • Upgrade doors to a solid core that can withstand excessive force.
  • Add wide-angle viewers to doors to accommodate all occupants including children or handicapped family members.
  • Windows and doors should be visible from the street. High shrubbery and plantings can provide thieves with a place to hide.
  • Don’t leave valuables where they are visible from doors and windows.
  • Don’t leave notes with details of your absence.
  • Photograph valuables and engrave, if possible, with your driver’s license number for insurance purposes. (Place a copy of your inventory and related photos in a safe deposit box in case of fire.) Don’t use your social security number to identify you valuables.
  • Remove all identifiers from your keys. If you lose them, there’s no reason to think they’ll fall into honest hands. If you believe someone has stolen your keys, have the locks changed.
  • Install electronic tracking type software (i.e. Absolute Software) onto your laptop.
  • Keep the garage door closed and locked. When exiting your garage, ensure that it closes before leaving. Thieves often wait for residents to exit the garage and will then enter before the garage door closes.
  • Install motion sensor-activated exterior lights on entry points. Not only will it discourage burglars, it also makes it easier for you to get into your home at night. Criminals do not like well lit targets.
  • Install timers to switch lights, televisions, or music on and off, especially if you’re planning to be gone.
  • Don’t announce on social media sites (i.e. Facebook, Twitter) that you are away from your residence or that you plan on going away.
  • If you are a female living alone, have a male friend/relative leave any outgoing messages on your land-line answering service. Also, only leave your first initial on your mailbox or doorbell.
  • Make sure that you have renter’s insurance, in the unfortunate event that you are victimized, at least your valuables will be covered.
  • Air conditioners that are installed in ground floor or basement windows, should be secured in a manner where they cannot be pushed in or pulled out.
  • If you arrive to your residence and believe someone may be inside, DO NOT confront the burglar, retreat to a safe area and contact the Hoboken Police Department at 201-420-2100. In the event that your are the victim of a burglary, do not touch an surfaces or items that the burglar may have touched and immediately contact the police.

There is nothing that can replace vigilant, caring, and concerned neighbors and friends.

Holiday season theft prevention tips

Thefts and break-ins often increase during the holidays, since thieves know that many homes are empty and stocked with high-priced gifts. Thieves also target the large numbers of packages left on doorsteps or in lobbies and other common areas. Here are some tips to keep in mind during the holiday season regarding package deliveries:

  • Choose a shipping option that requires you to sign for delivery.
  • Check on the package’s delivery status online so you can try to be home when it arrives.
  • Leave a note asking the delivery service to leave the package with a neighbor.
  • Have the package shipped to another location where someone can receive it, like your office or a friend’s home.
  • Ask the delivery service to hold your package for customer pick-up.
  • File a theft report immediately if you think your package was stolen, and contact your credit card company to find out if it offers a purchase-protection service that might reimburse you for stolen purchases.

Burglars also know that many households have new, and oftentimes expensive, items in their homes following the December holidays – especially items such as new computers and peripherals, stereo components, televisions, cameras and other electronic equipment. In too many cases, residents make it easy for burglars to figure out which homes to target by putting boxes that identify their new gifts in plain view with their other garbage. Avoid becoming an easy target for post-holiday burglars by not leaving boxes for new electronics and other items in the alley or other garbage pick-up locations for several days at a time. Instead, break down any boxes you are throwing out, put them in garbage bags and place them inside a trash can. (In many cases, especially with computer equipment, you might consider keeping the boxes for safe storage, shipping or moving in the future.) Think about keeping broken-down boxes inside – in a garage, for example – until the evening before your regular garbage pick-up. Some burglars actually look inside garbage cans for evidence of holiday gifts. In addition, please follow the residential burglary prevention tips listed above.

knowledge base: faqs



Does the Shade Tree Commission have a list of trees that they recommend for planting? View the approved list of tree species.

Who should trim the tree in front of my house? Please contact David Calamoneri.

I know of a tree that I believe is dying or is dangerous, who should I contact? Please contact David Calamoneri.

How do I become a volunteer for the Shade Tree Commission? Please contact Peter Bakarich III.

How do I apply to be a commissioner on the Shade Tree Commission? Submit an application for appointment to citizen advisory boards and commissions.

When does the Hoboken Shade Tree commission meet? Click here to view the meeting dates for 2015.

What are the benefits and reasons for planting trees in Hoboken? Read about 13 Reasons to plant trees.

How can I find out info on the tree(s) on my Street? View the Hoboken Tree Inventory.

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